How to re-enter the workforce after time away?

Have you taken a break from your job to start a family, taking time off after redundancy or temporary retirement? Did you want to leave the workplace to enjoy various opportunities like flying around the world? And did you take some time off to enjoy a break and rediscover yourself? Re-entry into the workplace can be a challenge, regardless of how strong the argument is. The global economy will make the quest more difficult and biased against people with wide gaps in their job history. Your doubts can delay even your return to work, or the subtle (or not-so-subtle) wish that you didn’t have to buck up and get a job.

  • Benchmark the condition:

Many people make the mistake of jumping right straight into their first job. Firstly, if you’re not sure about a position, the interviewer can sense your confusion and is unlikely to take you in the hiring process any further. Furthermore, if you land a position that is not appropriate for you, you might find yourself continually jumping around until you find the right one. So it is essential to take some time first to evaluate your situation and decide what you want to do. Open your mind and consider what was right before your career break may not be the best match for you right now.

  • Check your job pause with your CV:

If you can, start improving your CV a couple of months before you begin searching for a job. Volunteer, take an online course, research internships — do something that can help fill holes, rebuild and restart your life. Instead of viewing it as a handicap, see it as something constructive that might differentiate you from other candidates. When you haven’t played for a long time, don’t conceal this. A break will offer plenty of opportunities that can make you just as hireable, if not more, even if it’s only a chance for you to take a step back and re-evaluate your career.

  • Build an effective resume:

Focus on your talents and accomplishments, rather than the exact dates of your work. Create headings such as “marketing experience,” “sales success,” or “benchmarks achieved,” and then list your achievements.

  • Networking:

Don’t hesitate to use your current contacts while finding your first job after a career break. Spend some time reaching out to your bosses, clients, friends, and relatives. Let them know you’re looking for a new approach. They could have the ideal position for you, or they could point you in the right direction.

  • Be confident:

Without trust, you can easily undervalue what an employer can give. Write down your competencies and abilities on a sheet of paper. If you are unsure, ask family and friends to share their suggestions about where your strengths lie. They might be giving some ideas you didn’t know before. Be sure that you are doing your homework, too. Check at the web site and social media networks of the employer. Knowing you have all the details you need will allow you to be much more relaxed during interviews, in particular.

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